iShine Ambassador SpotLIGHT- Katie B. // Hiking + Yoga is GOOD for you, Harvard says so!

We need the tonic of wilderness. We can never have enough of nature.
— Henry David Thoreau

Katie B. is an iShine Ambassador - join her!
She will be leading an OUTDOOR HIKING + YOGA class Saturday

 

 

by iShine Ambassador, Katie B. 

"I have always been drawn to nature. It’s the place where I can feel small and take comfort in knowing there is something larger out there than me. Nature is the place where I feel the most connected to that something larger.  Where I feel the most in touch with the core (soul) of who I am. It’s where I know I am a significant part of this larger universe.

Summer nights host a symphony of crickets and cicadas harmonizing as fireflies cheer them on - flickering their lights.

That moment, at the break of dawn when the world opens its eyes for the first time and everything starts to yawn and stretch, awakening to greet a new day.

The smell of sweet rain being blown in through the window by a cool breeze in early Spring.

Leaves crunch under my feet on a Fall run.

A Winter snowfall that blankets everything around me silencing the world - which feels equal parts sobering and peaceful.

THESE are the moments that make me feel small, yet BIG."

"There’s a big part of me that knows deep down that feeling free and connected is all the verification I need to know just how powerful and healthy nature truly is. Turns out Harvard has a few things to say about it too.

According to Harvard Medical School, here are 5 ways going alfresco is beneficial for your health (mind, body and spirit)."

1. Your vitamin D levels will go up

Vitamin D is called the sunshine vitamin because sunlight hitting the skin begins the circuitous process — the liver and kidneys get involved — that eventually leads to the creation of the biologically active form of the vitamin. Over all, research is showing that many vitamins, while necessary, don't have such great disease-fighting powers, but vitamin D may prove to be the exception. Epidemiologic studies are suggesting it may have protective effects against everything from osteoporosis to cancer to depression to heart attacks and stroke. Even by conventional standards, many Americans don't have enough vitamin D circulating in their bodies. The good news is that you'll make all the vitamin D you need if you get outside a few times a week during these summer days and expose your arms and legs for 10 to 15 minutes. Of course, it has to be sunny out.

The either-or of sunscreen and sunshine vitamin has stirred up a lot of controversy and debate between pro-sunscreen dermatologists and the vitamin D camp. But there is plenty of middle ground here: some limited sun exposure on short walks and the like, supplemented with vitamin D pills if necessary, and liberal use of sunscreen when you are out for extended periods, particularly during the middle of the day.

2. You'll get more exercise (especially if you're a child)

You don't need to be outside to be active: millions of people exercise indoors in gyms or at home on treadmills and elliptical trainers. Nor is being outside a guarantee of activity. At the beach on a summer day most people are in various angles of repose.

Still, there's no question that indoor living is associated with being sedentary, particularly for children, while being outdoors is associated with activity. According to some surveys, American children spend an average of 6 hours a day with electronic media (video games, television, and so on), time that is spent mainly indoors and sitting down. British researchers used Global Positioning System devices and accelerometers, which sense movement, to track the activity of 1,000 children. They found that the children were more than doubly active when they were outside.

Adults can go to the gym. Many prefer the controlled environment there. But if you make getting outside a goal, that should mean less time in front of the television and computer and more time walking, biking, gardening, cleaning up the yard, and doing other things that put the body in motion.

3. You'll be happier (especially if your exercise is 'green')

Light tends to elevate people's mood, and unless you live in a glass house or are using a light box to treat seasonal affective disorder, there's usually more light available outside than in. Physical activity has been shown to relax and cheer people up, so if being outside replaces inactive pursuits with active ones, it might also mean more smiles and laughter.

Researchers at the University of Essex in England are advancing the notion that exercising in the presence of nature has added benefit, particularly for mental health. Their investigations into "green exercise," as they are calling it, dovetails with research showing benefits from living in proximity to green, open spaces.

In 2010 the English scientists reported results from a meta-analysis of their own studies that showed just five minutes of green exercise resulted in improvements in self-esteem and mood.

Mind you, none of the studies were randomized controlled trials. The intuitive appeal of green exercise is its strength, not the methodological rigor of the research supporting it. It's hard to imagine how a stroll in a pretty park wouldn't make us feel better than a walk in a drab setting.

4. Your concentration will improve

Richard Louv coined the term "nature-deficit disorder" in his 2008 book Last Child in the Woods. It's a play on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Researchers have, in fact, reported that children with ADHD seem to focus better after being outdoors. A study published in 2008 found that children with ADHD scored higher on a test of concentration after a walk through a park than after a walk through a residential neighborhood or downtown area. Other ADHD studies have also suggested that outdoor exercise could have positive effects on the condition. Truth be told, this research has been done in children, so it's a stretch to say it applies to adults, even those who have an ADHD diagnosis. But if you have trouble concentrating — as many do — you might see if some outdoor activity, the greener the better, helps.

5. You may heal faster

University of Pittsburgh researchers reported in 2005 that spinal surgery patients experienced less pain and stress and took fewer pain medications during their recoveries if they were exposed to natural light. An older study showed that the view out the window (trees vs. a brick wall) had an effect on patient recovery. Of course, windows and views are different than actually being outside, but we're betting that adding a little fresh air to the equation couldn't hurt and might help.

For more information on the Harvard article, please visit:

http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/a-prescription-for-better-health-go-alfresco

join Katie B. for the Hiking + Yoga this Saturday:

http://www.ishineyoga.com/merch/hiking-yoga

 

 




questions? comments?  we love to hear from you!
hello@ishineyoga.com  // 513-300-3478

Prenatal Yoga // 45 minute class

A baby is like the beginning of all things: wonder, hope a dream of possibilities. In a world that is cutting down its trees to build highways, losing its earth to concrete, babies are almost the only remaining link in nature, with the natural world of living things from which we spring.
— Eda J. Leshan

in this class, the mommies and i BLISS out for a yummy yoga class in huntersville, nc

learn more about my 6-week Prenatal Yoga Series here.

However much we know about birth in general, we know nothing about a particular birth. We must let it unfold with its own uniqueness.
— Elizabeth Noble

newborns photographed by yours truly (with love) 
Love & Light Photography